While Improving Internet Security, VPNs Also Have Risks

As we know, VPNs are not only used for business purposes. Many people uses VPNs to break geo-restrictions and unblock websites, such as users in China. The usual reasons for an organization to use VPN services are mainly for security consideration. This consideration includes security of the system, security of its information in transit and protection of its business network. For individual users, in order to keep their sensitive health information or financial data safe, they may also need a VPN.

All these tricks should be handled by a properly configured VPN. Your link between two separate Internet locations is encrypted by using strong algorithms that prevent people from intercepting your messages, whether from your rivals across the streets or to negotiating with Kim Jong-Un.

What do VPNs actually do?

Many VPN providers are owned by non-US corporations and that they may be able to collect (the same data that consumers think has been protected) information and then share it with other organisations.

So one question to be asked in the first place, can VPN providers share information in a decrypted way? Also, is such a sharing likely to take place?

A straightforward “yes” is the answer to the first question. It is completely possible for them to share whatever personal information you are providing through the VPN pipes from a purely technical perspective. The answer to the second question is “maybe”, of course, because it depends on the supplier, who operates this service, where it is practicable and what is its ethics.

This is due to the way many VPN services operate. When setting up the VPN, you create an encrypted tunnel at the site of the VPN provider between your computer and network and a server. Your link will be sent from there to its ultimate destination. During your VPN service sessions, your data may not be encrypted, and when sent back to the other side of your link, it may be encrypted.

Some VPN providers may not encrypt your data during the whole process. And if they so choose, any of them can decrypt your files. The risk lies in the time your information is spent on servers of the VPN provider. A scrupulous provider may, while in possession of another, send an unencrypted version of your results. How do you defend your business information in the light of this scenario?